How to Manage a Hangover

How to Manage a Hangover

There is no magic hangover cure, just ways to ease the pain

The party last night was great, but this morning you’re feeling it and paying the price. Your hangover is in full swing and all you want is a little relief. While there are things you can do to relieve the pain and get back on your feet, the best hangover cures are time and rest.

No Magical Hangover Cure
First of all, it’s important to remember that there is no magic solution to your problem. Many of those “hangover cures” you can pick up at the convenience store are practically worthless, so you might want to save your money. Some other hangover supplements may help you find relief, but it’s important to do your research to ensure they’re safe for you to use.

Let’s take a look at a few tried and true hangover cures that you can try. There are no gimmicks here, and you likely have everything you need.
1. Get Some Sleep
Rest is your best friend at this point because your body needs an opportunity to recover.2 Simply stay in bed as long as you can. Even an extra hour or two of sleep will help out tremendously.

If your hangover is really bad you might need to cancel whatever obligation you have this morning. Of course, that is not a recommendation to be irresponsible, but that’s something you should have thought about last night! Whoever you need to call, you will likely sound so bad on the phone that they may just believe your excuse. (That’s assuming they didn’t see you at the bar last night—then this is a very bad idea.)

2. Drink Water
Water is the first thing you should be drinking this morning. The alcohol you drank last night dehydrated your body and the best way to feel better is to rehydrate it.3 Have a glass right when you wake up and continue pouring yourself a fresh one over the next few hours. Just be sure not to overdo it because too much water can make you feel worse. Go slow, but keep the water flowing.Water is a better choice than fruit or vegetable juices; there is no scientific evidence that juice helps with a Hangover

Yet another option is a rehydration beverage, including sports drinks such as Gatorade as well as products like Pedialyte. The potassium, sodium, and electrolytes included in many of these drinks are designed to speed up fluid absorption and that may help when you’re hungover. There’s no evidence that these actually work better than water or juice, though. If you have some in the refrigerator, it can be an alternative to juice, but don’t rely on it.

3. Avoid Excessive Caffeine
Drinking a cup of coffee, if that’s something you do every day, is not necessarily dehydrating. It’s not a good idea to drink more coffee than you normally would, however.

Herbal tisanes are a good way to rehydrate, although there is no evidence that so-called detoxifying herbs will help with a hangover.

4. Get Some Vitamins
Your body could really use some vitamins right now. The easiest way is to drink orange juice for a healthy dose of vitamin C. One small study found evidence that zinc and B vitamins may reduce the severity of hangovers as well.6 If you have a multivitamin in the house, this is probably a good time to take that.

5. Eat Something
Food may seem like the last thing you want, but it can help. It doesn’t have to be much or anything that will make you sick. Try to eat mineral- and protein-rich food, even if you don’t feel like it.

Begin with something bland, like a piece of bread or a few crackers or pretzels. The carbs will help regulate your blood sugar, easing the shakes and dizziness.7 If that stays down, try something with a little more substance like a piece of fruit (bananas are excellent) or a smoothie. In Poland, drinking pickle juice is a popular remedy.

6. Avoid Pain Killers If Possible
Your head is pounding and it’s tempting to reach for a pain reliever. This is not the best idea when you’re dealing with a hangover. Over-the-counter (OTC) products like aspirin, Tylenol, and ibuprofen have side effects that are magnified while alcohol is in your system.

This is probably contrary to everything you want to do right now, but for your long-term health, it is good advice. Just like alcohol, aspirin is a blood thinner and the two in combination can intensify the effects. Tylenol (or acetaminophen) can cause more damage to your liver and ibuprofen can cause stomach bleeding.8

If you absolutely feel the need to take one of these, make sure it’s a very low dose of an NSAID (e.g., aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen). Avoid acetaminophen altogether.

References:

https://health.usnews.com/health-news/health-wellness/articles/2015/12/09/dealing-with-food-hangovers-cures-for-the-aftermath-of-overindulging

PharmahubNG

Welcome to Pharmahub!